Early Morning Quiz [NBA All-Star Game Edition] (February 17, 2019)

With the 68th edition of the National Basketball Association (NBA) All-Star game right around the corner, I decided to put my basketball knowledge to the test by answering the question, “Name all of the NBA All-Star Game MVP’s under 6 minutes.”

But this wasn’t just any ordinary online quiz as I stacked the proverbial playing field against me by answering it on my cellphone–which more or less eliminated the possibility of constantly scrolling down to see the progress of my answers–at the crack of dawn (6:24 am to be precise).

So here is how I did: 54.9%

Needless to say, I was quite disappointed as I could have scored a few more points with “Johnson” but my answer didn’t seem to register.  Maybe I should have written “Magic” or maybe–I was still half asleep–and DIDN’T write down “Johnson” or “Magic.”  But no excuses!

Here is my personal evaluation broken down into five blocks:

2013 Chris Paul!  Really!  He won it?  I wouldn’t have gotten this under six minutes for sure.

Still smarting over not getting “Magic Johnson” on my score card.

Julius Erving? Maybe I would have also gotten George Gervin, Dave Cowens, and Willis Reed with more time.  I remember going over the Celtics greats one-by-one before abandoning the list in favor of the 1992 Olympic Dream Team.

Big O, Rick Barry, and George Mikan….maybe if I had a little more time.

Mikan for sure but not Paul Arizin or Ed Macauley.

Oh, I almost forgot!  Happy 56th birthday to the GOAT Michael Jefferey Jordan!

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That Porzingis Deal (February 1, 2019)

Trade Breakdown

New York Knicks – Receive Dennis Smith Jr., DeAndre Jordan, Wesley Matthews, two future first-round draft picks[i], and $68 million worth of salary cap space.

Dallas Mavericks – Receive Kristaps Porzingis, Courtney Lee, Trey Burke, Tim Hardaway Jr. and a $12.9 million trade exception.

Ray Spalding is waved to create a roster spot. Continue reading “That Porzingis Deal (February 1, 2019)”

Understanding Markelle Fultz though my own injury (January 31, 2019)

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All in the name of pain relief: There is a several strategically placed Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) electrode pads underneath my towel draped hot packs.

The story so far…

After a decorated high school career and a so-so one-and-done freshman year with the Washington Huskies, the Philadelphia 76ers (#3) swapped draft positions with the Boston Celtics (#1) prior to the 2017 National Basketball Association (NBA) Draft in order to select heralded 6’3″ point guard Markelle N’Gai Fultz.

On paper, Bryan Colangelo–then the 76ers President of Basketball Operations–had assembled a young, talented, and exciting team[i] with Fultz being groomed as one of its pillars.  But after only four games to start the 2017-2018 NBA regular season, it was reported that Markelle Fultz would be out indefinitely due to “shoulder soreness and scapular muscle imbalance.”

The injury was described to be so severe that ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski was quoted as saying, “(Fultz) literally (could not) raise up his arms to shoot the basketball.”  In mid-March 2018, after a great deal of speculation surrounding his health, Markelle Fultz rejoined the 76ers and even posted a triple-double (13 points, 10 rebounds, and 10 assists in 25 minutes) on the last day of the regular season to become the youngest ever to accomplish the feat (19 years and 317 days).

Markelle Fultz opened his sophomore season as the 76ers starting shooting guard before losing his position to newly acquired Jimmy Butler.  Shortly after, Fultz went on indefinite leave from the 76ers in order to care for his ailing right shooting shoulder–diagnosed a neck and shoulder injury called Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS).

A better understanding

Whenever Markelle Fultz would come up in conversations with other basketball aficionados, I have to admit, I was highly critical for one reason or another.  But when I started developing my own shoulder problems late last year, I started to become more sympathetic to Markelle’s health situation. Continue reading “Understanding Markelle Fultz though my own injury (January 31, 2019)”

What I learned from Charles Wade Barkley (July 12, 2017)

 

Credit Sir Charles with an assist!

Even at 54, Charles Wade Barkley can still inspire people.

He has certainly inspired me.

After catching the NBA TV segment where he announced his intention to take better care of himself (1:02), I immediately said to myself, “If Charles can do it, I need to make a similar commitment.”

Well, I didn’t use those exact words but, well, you get the idea.

Putting in the work

Yup!  I’m up to three times a week already and I’ll be honest: It wasn’t easy…it’s still not easy…but I’m getting there.

It is my hope that this post will in someway inspired you to go down a similar path. Continue reading “What I learned from Charles Wade Barkley (July 12, 2017)”

Research Paper: Assisting Professional Basketball Players with Sports-Induced Concussions: A Psychologists’ Primer (March, 2011)

Introduction

As a young boy, I am embarrassed to admit that my exposure to the term “concussion” was largely limited to the storylines found in the world of professional wrestling as not a lot of information on the subject was readily available back then.  In fact, it was only during a National Basketball Association (NBA) playoff game in May of last year that I got to see up-close the potential career- and/or life-threatening effects that such an injury could cause.  It was Game 5 of the 2009-2010 Eastern Conference Finals and I can still remember watching a disoriented Boston Celtics basketball player named Glen “Big Baby” Davis struggle to get onto his feet and run down court after a defensive sequence against the Orlando Magic’s Dwight Howard.

It wasn’t clear what initially happened to the 6’9’’ Boston forward, but replays later showed that it was an inadvertent elbow to the face from the 6’11’’ Magic center that sent Davis crashing to the Amway Arena parquet floor where he stayed for what seemed to be an eternity.  Less than a minute later, a clearly dazed Davis finally collected himself and staggered down court before being caught by NBA referee Joey Crawford.

From the perspective of a spectator—and to some degree the officials, coaches, and teammates—the hit that Davis sustained may have looked negligible given his imposing frame.  But in actuality, a concussion—any concussion—is certainly no laughing matter if you take into consideration its debilitating “neuropsychologic effects” (Kushner, 2001) as well as the possible repercussions that this injury may have to their quality of life (Aldridge, 2003; Starkman, 2007; Parker-Pope, 2008; and Cahill, 2010).

To date, the initial diagnosis and management of concussions falls on team physicians or medical doctors before a “multidisciplinary team of professionals” (e.g., sport psychologists, clinical psychologists, athletic trainers, neurologists, etc.) can intervene (Powell, 2001; Fly, 2011; Krolik, 2011; and Washburn, 2011).  The author adds that before any member of the multidisciplinary team can assist in the treatment and rehabilitation of professional athletes, they must first be made aware what “constitutes a concussion” as well as other forms of treatment and guidelines.

With this in mind, the focus of this research paper is to provide interested psychologists with an overview of concussions, current injury policies, and possible interventions that they can consider when treating a concussed professional athlete.

Available for Purchase

You may purchase the complete research paper [Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF)] via Paypal’s ‘personal payment’ for only $1.99.  For more information, email sportpsychologist @ gmail.com