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Posts Tagged ‘Motivation’

Finding that need to exercise

08/12/2013 Leave a comment

As I was preparing for my circuit training class one afternoon, a fellow trainee came up to me and asked, “How do I motive myself to exercise?”  I thought about it for a moment and replied, “Well, getting yourself to the gym would be a good start.  Once you’re here and see all of us preparing—you’ll be raring to join us.”

Although said in a lighthearted manner, my classmate (if you will) got my point: Desiring exercise starts with putting oneself in an environment that promotes exercise.  This is followed by the need to have an intrinsic and realistic exercising goal that is not time bound.  To put it another way, your health/exercise goals should be your own and you shouldn’t forget to have fun while on your way to achieving them.

Exercise goals are long-term goals.  After all, very few of us can be like Elysium actor Matt Damon and spend four hours a day in the gym and be disciplined in what we eat—given the enormity of healthy food choices that we have available to us.  If you know what I mean…

Here are a few tips to get you started:

  1. Select an exercise activity that you find interesting and do some research – What is it? Is there a gym near you that offers it?  What are their rates?
  2. Like Goldilocks, try and try until you find the perfect fit – Don’t be discouraged if you are not too thrilled with your first exercise choice.  Just think that you have yet to discover the new one.
  3. Consult your doctor before engaging in any physical activity – Best to get the necessary clearances for your peace of mind.
  4. Start out the right way – Consult with a trainer or instructor for your first few sessions so that you’ll be more informed on the proper execution of your chosen exercise.
  5. Don’t forget to have fun and ‘rest days.’ – Getting fit and feeling better can be an enriching experience so always be mindful of the journey and not the destination.  Also know when to take a day off and rest as too much exercise may lead to unanticipated injuries.

Enjoy your exercise journey guys!

Contact information:

If you would like to set an appointment, you can reach Dr. Villasor at the Makati Medical Center trunk line number: 888-8999 (Local 2357) or through their direct line: 844-2941.

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The Gift of Motivation

07/17/2013 Leave a comment
Intervention: Designate a few personal key words that can help push you--thismuchcloser--towards your goals. On the top left are a few that I use to strengthen my resolve.

Intervention: Designate a few personal key words that can help push you–thismuchcloser–towards your goals.  Here are a few that I use to strengthen my resolve. (Photo Courtesy of Proactive.ph)

A couple of days ago, I was asked by a good friend if there were exercises that could “motivate people to do the things that they need to do.”

Sadly, I replied, “There isn’t any.”

When it comes to matters involving motivation, I believe that the limitation of every psychologist extends to their patient’s intrinsic motivation.  Simply put, a psychologist can help a patient who is self-motivated to some degree but can do nothing for someone devoid of any.

In Children

In my book entitled, “This Side Up: Short reads to being an effective parent” (scheduled to be released in early 2014), I share several situations wherein the attempts of well-meaning parents who influence their children towards athletics or some form of self-improvement are often met with resistance or complete disinterest.

Does this mean then that parents shouldn’t simply let their children be?  Of course not!  Parents just need to temper their own personal expectations and instead focus on simply exposing their child to the sport or desired activity.  Should the child gain some measure of enjoyment from this process, their feelings towards the activity may change to the point of self-motivation or what I refer to as ownership.

That said, you may no longer need to drag little Billy to his basketball camp in the morning as his ownership over the activity may spur him to wake you up first.

In Adolescents and Adults

In the case of older children and adults, true ownership or commitment towards a given activity (e.g., exercise, weight loss, etc.) is often difficult as rationalizing why we can’t do something is so much easier than why we have to.  Remember, true commitment is a daily, even hourly, process.  I won’t lie to you…it is difficult.

So, when it comes to the subject of exercise or work/study goals, surround yourself with like-minded people.  If someone says you can’t do something, believing him or her is the worst thing that you can do!  Prove them wrong by starting today!

I believe in you.

Contact information:

If you would like to set an appointment, you can reach Dr. Villasor at the Makati Medical Center trunk line number: 888-8999 (Local 2357) or through their direct line: 844-2941.